Hat Creek

Hat Creek

Hat Creek could possibly be the most legendary spring creek in the west, if not the entire country. With the riffle at Powerhouse 2 being the backdrop for thousands of articles and videos over the years it isn't as secret as it once was, but the fish are still there and anglers around the country still make the pilgrimage to this holy water. Abundant aquatic insect life gives anglers options, but there are only a few flies in very specific sizes that have been proven to fool these seasoned trout over and over again.

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Fall River

Fall River

The Fall River is, fortunately AND unfortunately, one of the most inaccessible rivers in America. Flanked by private property, this phenomenal spring creek has one singular access point, and a boat is mandatory. There is no walk and wade access on the Fall, but anglers who have invested in a drift boat or small pram will find gin-clear water, abundant aquatic vegetation and insect life, and legendary trout fishing.

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Lower Sacramento River

Lower Sacramento River

The Lower Sacramento river is...no great secret. Perhaps visible to a fault, many anglers take to its waters each day hoping to get a hero shot gripping a large rainbow trout under the well known Sundial Bridge, frequently to the applause of cyclists, stroller pushing parents and casual observers from the bridge's deck. The veritable armada of drift boats that storm the waters of the Lower Sacramento River each morning prove the river's pull in the angling community, and if landing large trout is your business on the Lower Sac, business is good. While best known as a drift boat accessed fishery, there are some walk and wade access points which somehow go overlooked by the general public. Plenty of the Lower Sacramento's oversized rainbow trout can be hooked and fought from shore no more than a stone's throw from public parks, restaurants and bars, making this urban fishery one of the most alluring spots to explore.

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Pit River

Pit River

Lions and tigers and bears...oh my! Well, no tigers (we think), but mountain lions, black bears, rattlesnakes and treacherous wading makes the infamous Pit River a daunting challenge for most anglers. Large boulders and deep, fast water means anglers should pull out all the stops. Solid boots, a tight wading belt, a wading staff and to be honest...a PFD (personal floatation device) are all warranted here. Now for the good news: the Pit River boasts more trout per mile than most any river in the West, and they're highly catchable. In fact, most anglers don't need to move far from one spot to catch fish after fish, and they're all good ones. It's there, if you dare. Just maybe bring a Garmin and tell a couple people where you're headed...just in case.

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McCloud River

McCloud River

Is the McCloud the best trout stream in the world? You wouldn't be the only person to have that thought run through your mind while you're landing the biggest brown trout you've ever seen in the net. Is the McCloud the worst river in the world? You also wouldn't be the only person to think that as you dodge poison oak, scramble down shale hillsides and get refusal after refusal from some of the most educated fish on the West Coast. You can't have the good without the bad, and in the case of the McCloud, nothing comes easy. But as all great things in life, the greater the challenge the greater the reward, and finally landing a resident rainbow or brown trout in one of the most pristine settings imaginable will be one of the most memorable experiences of your life.

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